Military Justice Legislation Amendment Bill – Committee Stage – Part 2 – Video 1

Military Justice Legislation Amendment Bill – Committee Stage – Part 2 – Video 1

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and so divided presently members we now turn to the Military Justice legislation amendment bill the questioners that part one stand part okay the questioners of the minister’s amendments it out on SOP number 37 v agree to those in favor will say aye to the country no the eyes Hobart the question is that part one is amended stand part all those in favor say aye to the country no the eyes have it we’d come to part two the debate on clauses 22 to 29 and schedule to the question is that part to stand part all those in favor say aye to the country no the eyes habit we come to part three the debate on clauses 30 to 34 and she jewel three I call the Honourable map which I think he made up to you it’s a pleasure to be able to take a call on this the military justice legislation I mean they’re built this is a very important bill can I acknowledge the minister in the chair for for his support and making sure that this built remained in the house and and any sort of safe passage through the house I think that I think one of the really 19 takes short called I think one of the points I really wanted to sort of talk to was around victims rights because we know our New Zealand Defence Force whether it be Army Air Force or or Navy it’s quite a small family and the terms of it’s not we’re not talking about big big numbers we’re talking about five five or six thousand people and so there’s often one of less than a degree of separation in actually ensuring that victims are looked after and in a given the rights and the care that they need through the process is actually fundamentally very important and so for the for the Military Justice legislation anemic bill to be able to align and make sure that that both the military justice system and our civilian criminal justice system are fully aligned and in particular victims are afforded the same rights and recognized as being treated the same and both systems was just one very small a small part but a very important part of the overall legislation in terms of what this bill is as trying to propose tried to affect this bill will ensure that victims of specified offenses have rights and protections in the military justice system there are equivalent to those that they would receive and the civilian system the bill also repeals a provision of the Armed Forces discipline act 1971 that places the onus of proof for defense on a specific charge onto the accused this is very important to although fundamentally our court system should always operate in the sense that the prosecution has to be able to prove beyond reasonable doubt an accused person’s guilt that’s a that’s a cornerstone of our justice system there are times – initially that that in relation to specific charges there is also an onus on the accused to be able to to be able to resent a form of a certain level of evidence in relation to certain cases so madam Chia I just finally like to wrap up and just say that again this is a very good bill I’m very pleased and want to acknowledge that the minister has seen fit to sit continue to support it there was a bill that was introduced in our last term and and just finished my contribution just with highlighting again and maybe the minister will take a call on this highlight and again the importance of victims rights inside this within the system as well thank you met impunity I call Duncan we thank you madam chair it is me if a Mitchell has noted this bill has been in the house for some time and it is

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