A guide to undergraduate studies in Law at UCT

A guide to undergraduate studies in Law at UCT

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Are you thinking of studying Law, but you aren’t quite sure if it’s the right choice? If you’re worried that this will be a
career-defining decision, you can relax. The truth is that your career
development is an ongoing life process, which may take you down several
paths throughout your working life. And some of these
paths may surprise you! Earning a degree can open
up a world of possibilities. Studying Law doesn’t mean
you can only be a lawyer. There are many career paths that Bachelor
of Laws, or LLB, graduates can choose. These include becoming an attorney – which would require you to do two years of a
paid internship to complete your articles – or becoming an advocate, which
requires one year of unpaid pupillage, where you study
under a practising advocate. You could decide to work towards
social and environmental justice in the non-profit sector, or to work
for government as a policy advisor. You may prefer to serve as legal
counsel or advisor in a corporate, or you could do something
completely different with the highly transferable skills
you learn doing an LLB degree. So, why choose to study Law at UCT? The University of Cape Town offers
highly regarded qualifications that combine solid academic
theory and research with innovative teaching methods
and some practical learning. UCT also offers a great range
of extracurricular activities, student development services, and opportunities for you to grow
your social responsibility experience. UCT law graduates are
highly sought after, not only in South Africa
but internationally. UCT attracts excellent students from
diverse backgrounds, ensuring a rich learning environment. The Faculty hosts 11
world-class research units. Let’s look at the three different
LLB programmes offered by UCT Law: First is a combined-stream LLB, for which you would first register
for an undergraduate degree in either Humanities or Commerce,
with Law as an undergraduate major. You would start your Law courses
only in the second year of study, assuming you have an average of
at least 65% in your first year. Once you have your first undergraduate
degree with Law subjects, you would then do a
two-year LLB degree. Second, in the four-year LLB programme, you
go straight into Law in your first year. This is a shorter,
less costly degree with fewer years of study
than the combined-stream LLB. However, you would not have had the
benefit of a Humanities or Commerce degree, which provides a strong foundation for
an LLB with a broader range of subjects, and an opportunity to hone your
analytical, research and writing skills. Alternatively, you might do
a three-year graduate LLB, in which you have an
undergraduate degree, but did not take Law as an
undergraduate major. If you choose to do a four-year LLB, you
must apply directly to the Faculty of Law. If you would prefer to do
a combined-stream LLB, you must apply directly to either
Commerce or Humanities. Now that you know what your options
are for completing an LLB degree, let’s talk about what
you’ll need to receive an offer. Your application will be assessed on: Your Faculty Points Score, which is calculated by adding the
percentages of the top six subjects in your final exams,
excluding Life Orientation. You do not need
Mathematics to study law. You will also need to take
the National Benchmark Test. You should do this as early
as possible in the year you apply, as this may lead to
an early provisional offer. If you are keen to know more about
the various Law programmes or the application process, contact us directly,
or visit the Law Faculty website. Applications for all LLB streams
close on the 31st of July. We look forward to hearing from you.

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